Coffee Klatch, Colleen's Book Reviews

Colleen’s Coffee Klatch & Review of The Necromancer’s Daughter by D. Wallace Peach, @Dwallacepeach

Hello everyone! Welcome to Colleen’s Coffee Klatch. Where I grew up, the Kaffee klatsch was all the rage. Folks (mostly women) would get together, share a cup of coffee, and catch up on their lives. Thanks so much for stopping by to share a cup of coffee and a chat. Every month, I like to reconnect with my favorite authors to catch up and see what’s new in their writing world.

This week I’m thrilled to introduce my friend & author & poet, D. Wallace Peach.

A long-time reader, best-selling author D. Wallace Peach started writing later in life when years of working in business surrendered to a full-time indulgence in the imaginative world of books. She was instantly hooked.

In addition to fantasy books, Peach’s publishing career includes participation in various anthologies featuring short stories, flash fiction, and poetry. She’s an avid supporter of the arts in her local community, organizing and publishing annual anthologies of Oregon prose, poetry, and photography.

Peach lives in a log cabin amongst the tall evergreens and emerald moss of Oregon’s rainforest with her husband, two owls, a horde of bats, and the occasional family of coyotes.

Amazon.com

Here you go, Diana. A little java to get us started. I can’t wait for you to share about your inspiration for The Necromancer’s Daughter.

Hi, Colleen. I’m delighted to visit with you today, and thanks for the latte! Yum. I brought some homemade Oregonberry muffins to share.

It’s the 2nd day of my big ol’ blog tour for The Necromancer’s Daughter, and I need the fuel. And thanks for asking about the book’s title and a bit about my inspiration.

I used to write a book from start to finish in about 6 months, but those days are long gone. This fantasy took me almost three times that. Life got busy, of course, but I also hope that I’m getting better at my craft, more deliberate maybe. We shall see when the book starts getting a little traction.

Some friends have asked me what a necromancer is, and what better time to clarify than at the beginning of the tour! According to dictionary.com a necromancer is “a person who uses witchcraft or sorcery, especially to reanimate dead people or to foretell the future by communicating with them.”

Necromancy? Did you channel Mary Shelley and her book Frankenstein?

The word “necromancy” dates back to the 3rd century AD. It’s been around a long time, and the desire to communicate with the dead continues today. Ouija Boards are a modern example, and some people make a very good living at channeling departed souls. Hopefully, no one is playing Dr. Frankenstein, but who knows?

In modern fantasy, most necromancers are evil and scary, involved in black magic and creating monsters. I love flipping stereotypes on their heads. So, my necromancer Barus is the sweetest, gentlest man around who resurrects the king’s dead infant and raises her as his own.

Naturally, not everyone in his world is happy about that. Especially when the king decides she’ll inherit the kingdom. Grown into a young woman, Aster is forced to flee her home to protect Barus and save her life. Thus, the adventure begins.

Here’s a bit more detail about the book from Amazon.com:

A healer with the talent to unravel death. A stillborn child brought to life. A father lusting for vengeance. And a son torn between justice, faith, and love. Caught in a chase spanning kingdoms, each must decide the nature of good and evil, the lengths they will go to survive, and what they are willing to lose.

A healer and dabbler in the dark arts of life and death, Barus is as gnarled as an ancient tree. Forgotten in the chaos of the dying queen’s chamber, he spirits away her stillborn infant and in a hovel at the meadow’s edge, breathes life into the wisp of a child. He names her Aster for the lea’s white flowers. Raised as his daughter, she, too, learns to heal death.

Denied a living heir, the widowed king spies from a distance. But he heeds the claims of the fiery Vicar of the Red Order—in the eyes of the Blessed One, Aster is an abomination, and to embrace the evil of resurrection will doom his rule.

As the king’s life nears its end, he defies the vicar’s warning and summons the necromancer’s daughter. For his boldness, he falls to an assassin’s blade. Armed with righteousness and iron-clad conviction, the Order’s brothers ride into the leas to cleanse the land of evil.

To save her father’s life, Aster leads them beyond Verdane’s wall into the Forest of Silvern Cats, a wilderness of dragons and barbarian tribes. Unprepared for a world rife with danger and unchecked power, a world divided by those who practice magic and those who hunt them, she must choose whether to trust the one man offering her aid, the one man most likely to betray her—her enemy’s son.

From best-selling fantasy author D. Wallace Peach comes a retelling of the legend of Kwan-yin, the Chinese Goddess of Mercy. Set in a winter world of dragons, intrigue, and magic, The Necromancer’s Daughter is a story about duty, defiance, cruelty, and sacrifice—an epic tale of compassion and deep abiding love where good and evil aren’t what they seem.

Kwan-yin is my favorite goddess. I have a statue of her on my altar in my office.

Diana, thanks for stopping by to share some details about The Necromancer’s Daughter. I loved this book so much. My review follows below.

Thanks again for the latte, Colleen. I’m thrilled to have had this chance to chat and talk a little about necromancers and the book. And many thanks to your blog friends for stopping by. Happy Reading.

Country Specific Book Purchase links:

US: https://www.amazon.com/Necromancers-Daughter-D-Wallace-Peach-ebook/dp/B0B92G7QZX

UK: https://www.amazon.co.uk/Necromancers-Daughter-D-Wallace-Peach-ebook/dp/B0B92G7QZX

CA: https://www.amazon.ca/Necromancers-Daughter-D-Wallace-Peach-ebook/dp/B0B92G7QZX

AU: https://www.amazon.com.au/Necromancers-Daughter-D-Wallace-Peach/dp/B0B9FY6YZJ

IN: https://www.amazon.in/Necromancers-Daughter-D-Wallace-Peach-ebook/dp/B0B92G7QZX

My Review: The Necromancer’s Daughter

Aster starts life amongst the dead, taking her mother, the Queen of Verdane, along with her. The King is bereft. Barus, the necromancer, is a cripple, and he’s forced to attend the birth. He alone is the one person who could save this child, the heir to Verdane.

Yet, the King cannot deal with what it would mean to save his daughter’s life and raise her from the dead. So, he rejects the baby. Meanwhile, the necromancer has fallen in love with the ethereal infant. He hides her tiny body in his robes and escapes to his hut in the woods.

Using his mother Olma’s ancient grimoire, he breathes life back into Aster’s body and calls her his daughter. For the next nineteen years, the girl grows up and lives in the tiny hut with the necromancer.

Barus is patient and kind. He teaches her about the herbs and potions needed for healing. Aster learns to love all life, including the spectacular black and silver dragon who eats apples from her hand.

Each year, on the anniversary of her birth, Aster receives a visit from the King. By now, he knows Aster is his daughter. On her nineteenth birthday, the King finally talks to her, admitting she is his heir. This admission prompts his enemies to act, upending her life with the Necromancer. Can she save the life of the man she calls father?

Peach’s words flow from the page, painting emotional images in my head. Some of the imagery is poetic, which drew me deeper into the story. The characters are all multifaceted, so real, as they struggle to deal with what life tosses their way.

I’m a huge fan of D. Wallace Peach’s fantasy books. But this book touched something deep inside of me. Maybe it was because the protagonist was compassionate and kind. It could have been because I love stories that feature the eternal battle for good over evil, or even that I just connected with the characters on a deeper level. Or, it was the crystal panthers and the dragons that spirited me away to a land of magic and intrigue.

Even with the title of the book, I couldn’t have foreseen the ending. It blew me away! I loved this book so much, I’ll be purchasing the paperback for my collection.

So, here’s where I’m at… I have the worst book hangover I’ve had for a long time. I can’t get the characters out of my head. The fact the story was based on the Chinese myth of Kwan-yin makes this book even more memorable for me.

Now where did I put the Tylenol? Maybe I’ll just go read the book again… that will take care of this book hangover! Join me… grab your copy today.

D. Wallace Peach’s Media Connections

Amazon Author’s Page: https://www.amazon.com/D.-Wallace-Peach/e/B00CLKLXP8

Website/Blog: http://mythsofthemirror.com

Website/Books: http://dwallacepeachbooks.com

Twitter: https://twitter.com/Dwallacepeach

Would you like to stop by for coffee and a chat? Email me at tankatuesdaypoetry@gmail.com and fill me in your news. I can’t wait to hear what’s happening in your world! 💜 🦄 🧹

208 thoughts on “Colleen’s Coffee Klatch & Review of The Necromancer’s Daughter by D. Wallace Peach, @Dwallacepeach”

    1. Thanks for stopping by and for picking up the book, Rebecca. Colleen’s review practically brought tears to my eyes. Lol. She’s so generous with her words, and I couldn’t be happier. Sending hugs right back at you. 🙂 ❤

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    1. Colleen blew me away with her review, Jaye and Anita. I love it when someone connects with a book, and I’m over the roof with gratefulness for her kind words. Thanks for taking the time to visit, and have a beautiful week. Hugs.

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  1. Wonderful post, Colleen, and excellent review. I’ve just begun reading Diana’s latest. Like you, I have a special love for Kwan-yin and all that she represents. My heartfelt congratulations to Diana. ❤️

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    1. Thanks, Gwen. I have to admit that until I started looking for stories, I didn’t know who Kwan-yin was. Everything about her tale fit right down to the presence of dragons (and then, of course, I took lots and lots of liberty in my retelling). I hope you enjoy the read. Happy Labor Day, and huge hugs.

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  2. Congratulations to Diana on the excellent review for The Necromancer’s Daughter. I read her discussion about necromancy with a great deal of interest. I think it’s an archetypal desire to somehow cheat death, even appearing in the parable of Lazarus in the Bible. I’m wondering if the advent of Christianity prompted the negative connotation necromancy developed.

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    1. During the middle ages, Liz, necromancy and exorcism were closely linked, and though the church condemned the occult practice, most of the practitioners were clergy. It was fun researching this from the politics right down to the rituals and the herbal poisons. And I totally agree that cheating death was likely the impulse. Thanks so much for stopping by Colleen’s to read. Happy Labor Day. 🙂

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          1. Thank you! I need all the help I can get. (But I’m the one who decided to take on something I’ve never done before.) I’m sure your muse will visit you when she determines the time is right.

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    2. It certainly had an effect on paganism so it’s logical that Christianity played a part in demonizing necromancy. It’s always portrayed as evil, isn’t it? But, from a healing perspective it’s no different, than healing an ailment. That’s my perspective as a pagan Buddhist. This is a fabulous book. I believe it’s at a special price. I think you would enjoy the read. Diana is a master storyteller. ❤️

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      1. Reading Frankenstein, I was struck by how Victor’s initial impulse to bring the dead back to life stemmed from the universal experience of grief at the death of a loved one, but in the end, pride at trying to play God was what did him in.

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        1. In my British Literature class, (long ago) we discussed how modern Mary Shelley was dabbling with life and death in Frankenstein. She was interested in electricty, and how it would play a part in modern medicine. She penned this novel during the coldest year Europe had ever seen. There’s a delightfully wicked aspect to restoring life to the dead. She nailed it!

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  3. Diana has another hit novel here. I love the romance and adventure in this one. The good and evil ideas of necromancy, besides being central to the plot, add something special to the balance. It often had me thinking “what if” this and “what if” that – the good and bad of having such a gift. I really enjoyed this well-written book.

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    1. I never think of myself as a romance writer, Anneli, but I do like including it, especially when it’s so full of conflict. How we define good and evil, our reasons for love and hate, are such great themes to work with. Thanks so much for the visit to Colleen’s. The two of you gave me the perfect start to my tour. Hugs.

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      1. I hesitated to use the word “romance” as I know it has a whole other connotation in publishing, but let me correct it to say I meant the love story element of your book. I always like it when an exciting drama has a love story running alongside it, and you do that so well.

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  4. What a fun post. I had looked up the definition of a necromancer before reading the book. 🙂 I highly recommend this book to anyone who loves a fantasy told in a super compelling way! I actually held my breath a time or two through the story. 🙂 Thank you, Colleen, for helping Diana launch this fabulous new book!

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    1. Thanks for the visit and the kind comment, Jan. Breath holding is good! Lol. There were quite a few readers who didn’t know what necromancy was, and I thought it had an interesting history, worth sharing. And thanks for your wonderful review too! Have a lovely holiday and week ahead, my friend. Hugs.

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  5. What a super fun post, Colleen. Thank you so sooo much for the wonderful opportunity to visit and, of course, for the amazing review. I’m sorry about the need for Tylenol, but I’m also touched and grateful that you enjoyed the book and the characters. And how cool that you have a statue of Kwan-yin in your office. She was the perfect inspiration for Aster. Thanks again for your kindness and light, my friend. Hugs.

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  6. Thank you Colleen for the fun and enticing review of Diana’s latest book. It’s waiting in my book cue to be read. I’m getting impatient and may have to move it up the line! I like the new look of your blog and appreciate all that you do for our writing community. Where’s my latte? 😊

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    1. Thanks for taking the time to stop by and read, Brad. Wasn’t the review awesome? Colleen outdid herself. And I’m delighted to hear that the book is making its way up the pile. No rush, I’m just grateful that it’s there waiting for you. And I have your latte right here. Come on over. 😀

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    1. Thanks for dropping by, John. I enjoyed sharing some of my research as I learned the details about necromancy. Ancient and medieval humans were so curious about how things worked. And Colleen’s review was beyond words. Happy Labor Day, my friend.

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  7. I love the way you have presented this post Colleen and absolutely agree with you that the characters of this book lurk around… never heard of a book hang over but yes, I do understand it now! Who can say I love the necromancer but I do love! Fabulous review of a brilliant work. Congratulations Diana.

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    1. I agree, Balroop, that the post was set up wonderfully. Colleen’s a pro in everything she does. I’m so glad that the characters are memorable for you too. Thank you for the visit and the lovely comment. And book hangovers? I love those. Ha ha. Have a wonderful day, my friend. ❤

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  8. Great post, Colleen and Diana. Between the two of you, I really enjoyed every bit of it! AND–tada!–I started reading this one in bed last night. I was absolutely hooked from the very first page. So much so that I read until I literally fell asleep, and then was rudely awaked when my Kindle smacked me in right in the face! I tried to wake up enough to turn another page, but sleep won out. However, I know I’ll get lots of excellent reading time in tonight.

    Diana, your prose is to die for! The descriptions are so real, it’s like watching a Mind Movie, only better, because … WORDS! Yummy, beautiful, and powerful WORDS. I can’t wait to dig in again and see where this story takes me.

    Thanks for a superb post, both of you ladies, and Diana, I’m wishing you HUGE success with this one! 🤗❤️🤗

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      1. Oh, that sounds like a Plan, Colleen! Will do. And you’re welcome for the comments. I think you and anyone else who has read this one will know exactly what I was talking about. (PS, may I have tea instead of coffee??? Just wonderin’! 😁)

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    1. LOL. That book-smacking-face thing happens to me all the time, Marcia. So funny. I’m glad you enjoyed the post, and I’m thrilled that you’re enjoying the book, especially the style of writing, which I put a lot of effort into. I love language, the sounds, rhythms, and pictures we paint with words. Yay. I’m so grateful to be here at Colleen’s and appreciate your visit. Huge hugs, my friend, and Happy Labor Day.

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      1. Yes! The sounds, rhythms, and pictures we paint with words. You have perfected that, my friend, and it’s why I’ve enjoyed every book of yours I’ve read to date, and why I was instantly hooked on this one! Huge hugs back atcha, and a very Happy Labor Day, too! (And it’s about time for me to take a lunch break … with my KINDLE propped in front of me as I eat. Guess what I’ll be reading??) 🤗❤️🤗

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    1. Thanks so much for dropping by, Marje. Colleen pulls together a marvelous post, and her review put me over the moon. I’m delighted that you’re enjoying the book and look forward to spending a day at your place too! Happy Labor Day and Happy Reading!

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  9. I loved the innocence of the necromancers and the story. Like you, I hope there are no Dr. Frankensteins out there but you never know. Great review too! Hugs xo

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    1. Yeah, hopefully no Dr. Frankensteins! Lol. As the book demonstrates, it could create some big problems. I’m so glad you enjoyed the twist on the stereotype, Denise, and the innocence of the necromancers. That’s what I was hoping for. Have a beautiful Labor Day, my friend. ❤

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    1. Wasn’t it a gorgeous review, Priscilla? I’m so flattered and grateful when someone “feels” the book like I do, as well as recognizes the work that went into it. Thanks for dropping by Colleen’s today. Have a wonderful week. 😀

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    1. Thanks, Resa, for following the tour. It’s been a blast so far with my wonderful hosts. Colleen’s post was pure joy, and I’ve loved hanging out here. Thanks again for your kind support and for cheering me on. Huge hugs.

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    1. Thanks so much for stopping by at Colleen’s, Andrea. I learned quite a bit about necromancy while researching details for the book. Like with alchemy, our predecessors were trying to figure out how the world worked, and it was all wrapped up with superstition. I’m just thrilled that you enjoyed the book. Hugs.

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      1. Yes, we seem to be driven to create order out of chaos, even if it’s only the semblance of order. 🙂 I particularly liked the fact that you gave necromancy a /cost/…to the user. That, I think, as much as the innate goodness of Barus and Aster is what turned necromancy into a good thing rather than a bad one. lol Could have a philosophical discussion on this for hours!

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        1. I like it when “magic” has a cost, Andrea, otherwise it’s too easy. And lots of truly good things we do in real life entail some degree of cost. The societal downside (everyone clambering to the gates with their deceased loved ones) wasn’t planned, but came up while writing as a logical consequence. I love it when that happens! Thanks for the great comment. 😀

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          1. Yes! I remember that particular bit because it was so “of course!”. Always obvious after the fact, but you were the one who saw it. 🙂 Those moments are both the most frustrating – if you have to change your storyline because of them – and the most rewarding because they’re so perfect.

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          2. I can relate to the frustration part the most. Lol. I had one of those yesterday, asking myself, “Why wouldn’t the winter king just kill her? That would be the logical thing to do.” Now I need to come up with the answer to that question. Sigh.

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          3. -hugs- it’ll come to you. Maybe there’s some part of /his/ past that stops him? Or perhaps there’s some political reason? Whatever it is, I know it will feel absolutely right when you find it.

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  10. My first thought reading here was a neither-here-nor-there with regard to Diana’s wonderful book. When I read this in the opening:

    Where I grew up…[f]olks (mostly women) would get together, share a cup of coffee, and catch up on their lives.

    … I thought, “It’s too bad there weren’t more men—that in some cultures, such community circles have been seen as’ something women do.’ Men need this kind of connection as much as anyone. ”

    Like I said, neither-here-nor-there on the post and book tour. So I’ll now go here, followed by there.

    I enjoy the casual, conversational nature of your blog, Colleen, as well as your willingness to include so many others: today, Diana.

    I’ve left my thoughts on The Necromancer’s Daughter many places by now; so here, I’ll leave a thought I haven’t anywhere else. Among all there is to love about this book (and, truly, all of Diana’s stories) is the pacing. Diana has a wonderful sense of pacing. She can intentionally lull a reader into safety just enough to effectively pull the rug out from underneath. She can take an already tense moment and ramp it up of a sudden or take it in an unexpected direction. And yet nothing is contrived. There are no “convenient” elements placed just to shock the reader. Everything has purpose. Everything makes sense by the last turn of the page. Yet even her ending (here and in all of her stories) will continue the page after that last turn, as the reader thinks through how they feel about where it all landed. You know it feels right; you’re just left to settle why. (You captured this feeling with your need for Tylenol, Colleen—paired with feeling that diving back in would somehow resolve it!)

    Diana’s is a rare talent. And I love it.

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    1. You’re so kind to me, Erik. I appreciate the visit and the wonderful comment. I think I’ve gotten better with pacing over the past decade. It’s something I work on since my tendency is to overwrite/overdescribe. I have to focus on cutting and tightening through most of my drafts. And you’re right about Colleen’s blog and posts. She really is such an expert at making people feel welcome. You’d made a great guest! Thanks so much for taking the time to stop by, for your wonderful review, and for your excellent feedback. Have a great week. ❤

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  11. Wow! That’s one great review. And I loved the whole post and conversation with Diana. I can’t wait to sink my eyes into this book. Only 3 ahead in line before I too can get absorbed in this magical tale Diana created. Congrats again Diana. You’ve done it again!!! M3 xx

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    1. Wasn’t the review gorgeous, Debby? I’m so grateful to Colleen for taking the time to read and share. These sweet characters have struck a chord, it seems, which tells me the “good and kind character” experiment worked! Of course, I put them through the wringer. I hope you enjoy the book whenever it crosses your BFK. 😀 Thanks for the wonderful comment and have a beautiful week. ❤

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  12. Colleen thanks for this interview introducing D. Wallace Peach and her book!
    My stack of TBR books grows with all the great writers I meet through blogging.

    Continued success to all who enjoy writing and love life!

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    1. Ha ha ha. Thanks, Lauren. I’m so excited that you’re reading the book. Who needs a job and chores, when a book calls? And reading is still the best deal around. I hope you enjoy the story. It’s been a pleasure to spend time at Colleen’s and I so appreciate her review. Happy Reading. ❤

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      1. Well, like I said (and will always believe), good writing is good writing. I’m not a huge western fan, but a friend of mine wrote one of the best books I ever read, and it was a western. I don’t much care for (sad) fictionalized history (like war stories), but another friend of mine fictionalized her mother’s story of a Japanese internment camp, and that book was also phenomenal. I always enjoy your work, Diana. Not because of the genre, but because of what you do with it.

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  13. The Necromancer’s Daughter is a fabulous book! I think it’s my favorite of Diana’s to date. Given what a talented author she is, and how much I’ve enjoyed her previous work, that says a lot. She really nailed it with this one. And you’re right, Colleen–those characters do linger in your head.

    Congrats to Diana on another fantastic review!

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  14. I absolutely loved The Necromancer’s Daughter! Huge congrats, Diana, and wishing you every success! Kwan-Yin is my favourite too 😁. I love what you did with Barus’s character and the whole necromancy thing! Hugs 💕🙂

    Colleen, thanks for sharing Diana’s new release! 🙂

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  15. I was afraid to read the entire review before finishing the book, but what I did read is wonderful. I’m not a fantasy reader… Wait. I don’t read other fantasy books, but I do read Diana’s. I love your style and imagination, Diana. Thanks for defining necromancer. I like your version. Thanks for sharing, Colleen.

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    1. Colleen didn’t give away any spoilers, Mary, but I’m like you and like to read a book without anyone else’s impressions. I’m honored that you take a chance on my books even though fantasy isn’t your preferred genre. That means a lot to me. Have an awesome afternoon, my friend, and Happy Reading!

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    1. Thanks so much for taking the time to stop by Colleen’s, Cindy. I’m delighted to hear that you decided to pick up the book and give it a try. Thank you, thank you! Wasn’t the review wonderful? I was so thrilled to read it. Have a beautiful day, my poetic friend. I’m glad you two are connected!

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  16. What a wonderful way to talk about this exceptional book over a latte and Oregon berries muffin Colleen and Diana! What a kind soul Barus is, brought Aster back from death and raised her as his own. I love Diana’s fantasy and I’m sure this one is my new favorite. I’ll start reading it soon. Your review is excellent, Colleen. I agree with you on Diana’s words painting emotional images and her poetic writing. I enjoyed this delicious interview and review! 🙂

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    1. Thanks so much for taking time out of your super busy day(s) to visit, Miriam. I can’t believe how you manage to blog, handle your own book tour, pack your home, and move to a new state all at the same time! Don’t overdo it and wear yourself out. So extra hugs for stopping by Colleen’s to offer your kind support. Huge hugs, my friend. ❤ ❤

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  17. I’m about halfway through this, and I just adore Barus and his relationship with Aster. Diana has a genuine talent for creating characters that worm their way into your heart. Thanks for hosting, Colleen!

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    1. Thanks so much for reading, Teri. And I’m honored that you’re enjoying the characters. I like creating terribly flawed characters, so this was a new challenge for me. Thanks for stopping by Colleen’s to give the book a boost. See you on Friday. 🙂 Can’t wait.

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    1. Thanks for stopping by at Colleen’s, Toni. I don’t have to do much research for my fantasy books, but I do some, and this was a fascinating topic. Our ancestors were quite inquisitive, superstitious, imaginative, and willing to try anything. 🙂 Glad you enjoyed the post!

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  18. I like learning more about what a necromancer is. I’ve begun Diana’s book (and must say, I’m hooked immediately and completely) and figured out what the word means by the context in the book, but this history of necromancer is fascinating. And the altar! I’d like to know more about that. It’s in the author’s office – does it help focus with writing? I’ve just began to collect more crystals and am placing them at strategic places in the house. Not sure why, but it seems right. To magic and (good) witchcraft. I believe in both. And this book? FANTASTIC. Great review and highlights, Colleen.

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    1. Kwan Yin is in my office, Pamela. And yes, she does help me with writing, my poetry, Reiki, and many other parts of my life. I love my crystals. When I meditate, I hold different crystals in my palm. I feel the energy from the crystals. I bet you do too, that’s why they feel good to you. Yes, always good witchcraft and magic. I’m so happy you’re loving the book. Diana’s fantasy is always good, but this one is really special. 💜

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    2. Thanks so much for the wonderful comment, Pam. I’m glad you got the idea of necromancy from the context, but it does have an interesting history (not just a made-up thing for fantasy and horror readers). That is very cool about placing crystals around your house. I love all that positive energy. ❤ Thanks so much for reading the book, my friend. I'm tickled pink and hope you enjoy it. Huge hugs.

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  19. “Necromancy” is quite a beautiful and poetic word, and how nice that you illumined the background of it here, Diana! Best of luck with The Necromancer’s Daughter!

    And thank you, Colleen, for the insightful review of the book!

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    1. Thanks for taking the time to stop by Colleen’s, Sean, and for checking out her review. I couldn’t have asked for more. And I smiled when I saw your comment. Necromancy is a poetic and mysterious-sounding word, and it has an interesting history. Perfect for fantasy. Have a wonderful evening, my friend. 🙂

      Liked by 2 people

    1. It’s about 6:00 am here, Sheri, and I actually do have a yummy latte in hand. Lol. Enjoy your black coffee. 🙂 And your book arrives tomorrow, right? I can’t wait to learn what you think about it. I’ve had a lovely start to my tour and couldn’t be happier with my wonderful hosts. Colleen’s review was fabulous. Happy Reading! ❤

      Liked by 2 people

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